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The Republic of Grammaria

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Bad Grammar - The Way I Are [28 Nov 2008|08:01pm]

morbid_curious
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New member [03 Jun 2007|06:38pm]

37thyear
I've just joined - but am I too late?  Is grammar already dead and buried?
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interesting article [14 Jun 2006|09:32pm]

sevanetta
[ mood | chipper ]

An article speculating on that oft-debated topic, the worsening standards of English (particularly written English):

http://bulletin.ninemsn.com.au/bulletin/site/articleIDs/31110AEEEEBB7E09CA2571850014A90A

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Help, I'm sinking! [23 May 2006|03:59pm]

dazyndara
[ mood | annoyed ]

In my office there are a number of employees with PDAs which they have to synchronise with the computer network. Every day, they say something along the lines of this-

"I just have to synch my handheld. Have you sunk yours yet?".

Is it just me, or is that somewhat atrocious?

3 comments|post comment

Allow me to introduce myself. [16 May 2006|10:53am]

xjenavivex
Hi,
I am new to this community. This is indeed my first post. ”…”Collapse )
11 comments|post comment

Message received? [21 Apr 2006|02:31pm]

mattmatt
[ mood | dit dit dah on your mobile phone ]

I am certainly no opponent of the verb to text. After all, it is really no different from to call1, and "I'll text you" is certainly less unwieldy than "I will send a Short Message to your cellular phone" (OK, admittedly, somewhat contrived).

However, I refuse to swallow text as its own past tense: "he text me to ask me out" is how it's pronounced, as if the root word were actually "tex" and the participle "texed". See how odd it looks when written down?

Help stop the spread of this outlandish aberration, 4 PTZ SK.

1I'd argue, in fact, that it follwed a similar etymological process, if you can accept that this sense of to call is a back-formation from to make a telephone call, and not just a lateral shift from the regular meatspace meaning of yelling to someone.

4 comments|post comment

Verb tenses [16 Apr 2006|01:52pm]

zhirafov_nyet
I hope this is the proper place to ask. Verb tenses are an important part of grammar. Also, excuse any mistakes. I am not a grammarian, but I have an important question.

A Russian friend of mine came across the present perfect continuous tense in her book and became confused by the two types. The first type, inclusive, was easy enough to understand. According to the book, the inclusive type means that an action was started in the past, has lasted for a while, and is still happening. Then there's the exclusive type. The book says that this type applies to an action that started in the past, lasted for a while, and has just stopped. How is this possible? Wouldn't something that has just stopped be referred to in the past tense? If this is possible, please provide an example. Thanks!
7 comments|post comment

Commas, anyone? [09 May 2005|07:53pm]

dnz4him
[ mood | Amused ]

Taken directly from mugglenet.com, a popular Harry Potter news source:

The grammar fairy rears its ugly head...
99% of you won't consider this news, but the 1% of you that were bothered by the incorrect punctuation usage on the quote on the Goblet of Fire promotional poster will be happy to note that a comma has been added between the words "ahead" and "Harry".

And so ends "Comma-gate".
Posted by Emerson on 05/09 | comments [190] | send to friend | submit news



May the 1% rejoice.

3 comments|post comment

Because I haven't for a while [18 Apr 2005|02:22pm]

mattmatt

It's bated breath.

As in, I'm waiting so hard I'm not even letting myself breathe, not "hey fish! please swim in my mouth!"

3 comments|post comment

Be Seeing You. [24 Mar 2005|03:58am]

mrs_fry
This sign is in the window of the Indian dry cleaners in Thornton Heath:-

FIVE CLOTH IN THE PRICE OF FOUR

Not bad considering English is probably their second language, but still, they ARE British and are probably second-generation and were born here, so no excuse really. It sounds rather mysterious and masonic, or like something from The Prisoner doesn't it?
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New Member [08 Mar 2005|11:26am]

mrs_fry
[ mood | peaceful ]

Hello! I have just joined. I love grammar and want to get it right, but feel I make mistakes a lot. Please feel free to show me when I make mistakes! Thank you. At least I never write "alot" or "thankyou" (cringe). Also, I have a real problem with which side of quote marks to put full stops or commas or semi-colons or colons, when I am using them (the quote marks) not to indicate speech but to show that I am using a term I don't necessarily condone or agree with, or to be sarcastic. Can anyone advise me?

2 comments|post comment

Hello. [20 Dec 2004|12:14am]

saraken
[ mood | tired ]

I've just joined.

Ahem.

I've a couple questions.

Mr Wilson's, my teacher, cat likes to eat paper.
Mr Wilson, my teacher's, cat likes to eat paper.
Mr Wilson's, my teacher's, cat like to eat paper.
Mr Wilson (my teacher)'s cat likes to eat paper.

How to deal with such situations (other than by avoiding them)?

And is the distinction between 'shall' and 'will' important any longer?

6 comments|post comment

Grammar Question [19 Oct 2004|11:20pm]

mahatmaplucky
Hello,

I have a question. What is the plural of Mercedes-Benz, the plural of Mercedes, and the plural of benz?

Thank you.
5 comments|post comment

Request! (cross-posted like crazy) [17 Oct 2004|02:22pm]

indigosarah
New member! I am looking for people to take this poll. Weight in on the weighty issue, if you so desire. Thanks in advance.
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[17 Oct 2004|03:10pm]

liquidhuman
I need help! I pride myself on thinking that I am a grammar nazi, and I am involved in an intense love affair with the semicolon, but right now I need the help of my fellow grammar sticklers.

"High-tech devices not only may better facilitate communication..."

OR

"High-tech devices may not only better facilitate communication..."

I am searching the Little, Brown Handbook for answers. Your assistance is greatly appreciated!
3 comments|post comment

'pleaded' or 'pled'? [24 Sep 2004|11:49pm]

raendrop
Which is the correct past tense form of "to plead"? Is it "pleaded" or is it "pled"? (And if it's "pled", is it spelled that way? Or is it "plead [pleed]" and "plead [pled]" like "read [reed]" and "read [red]"?)
3 comments|post comment

Another thing that irritates me... [19 Sep 2004|01:21pm]

graeco_celt
[ mood | thoughtful ]

(I'm easily irritated, it appears) My former flatmates were forever accusing me of being "too fussy" about language. Every time I made a comment or corrected their grammar, they would call me the "grammar police" Now, I don't object to them disliking my habit of correcting people's speech (I'm aware it can be annoying) but it bothers me a little that (apparently) I have taken on the status of an entire disciplinary force! Either "grammar policewoman", "grammar police officer" would work but "grammar police"? Police is a collective noun, which implies I have a lot more personalities than the six I actually have... This is a good example, I feel, of at least one of the reasons some of these linguistic changes occur: it's far quicker and catchier to say (in this case) "police", than "policewoman" or "police officer". Basically, we're a lazy race! I've become even more aware of my own linguistic shortcomings recently, through constant contact with speakers of other languages. It's a bit embarrassing to have to repeat yourself, when speaking to a non-native speaker of your language, when you realize the need for repetition has been caused by your own lazy pronunciation, not their inability to understand you!

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[19 Sep 2004|07:53am]

graeco_celt
[ mood | frustrated ]

Ah, finally!

I can't believe it took me so long to find this community.

I haven't, as yet, had time to go right back through all of the entries (though I will, I'm sure), so if anyone has already addressed this issue, I apologize.

This may only be relevant to those who live in New Zealand (I don't know if the franchise exists elsewhere):

Pak'n Save...

Leaving aside the misspelling of 'pack', which I'm assuming was deliberate, we are left with the issue of the apostrophe. Whoever thought up this name is obviously aware of the 'replace missing letters with an apostrophe' rule. My question is, why did they only use one to replace the 'a' of 'and'? There is a 'd' missing AS WELL, children!!!

9 comments|post comment

PROMOTING. [12 Sep 2004|12:13pm]

ktg_is_weird_08
richard_lederer
richard_lederer
richard_lederer
richard_lederer
richard_lederer
richard_lederer
richard_lederer
richard_lederer
richard_lederer
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PROMOTING. [19 Jul 2004|10:48pm]

ktg_is_weird_08
[ mood | happy ]

Hey guys, since I know you guys are grammar fans, please join my community richard_lederer (if you're a fan of him). (I'm the mod.)

1 comment|post comment

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